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ART FROM THE OBSOLETE

krashtrash is an assemblage art project by Marcus Kihn that utilizes parts from obsolete computers and other electronic devices. It was conceived out of the current frustrations of technology and its never ending, relentless need to turn once loved electronic devices into tomorrows garbage. It is wastefulness at its finest and we are all subject to this continuing pattern of wasted resources.  How sad is it that we throw away entire machines because of a simple part that needs upgrading.

 

Being a heavy tech user, the ongoing waste angered me even more because of all the money I was spending just to keep up with these corporations that can’t seem to leave things alone. They constantly try to “fix what ain’t broke” for this simple purpose of making more money. Just read some of Jacque Fresco’s material about where we are now, the future and The Venus Project. They captivated me and shed some new light on what we’re doing wrong and how we can move toward fixing it with a new way of looking at things.

krashtrash is my contribution to this problem in my own unique way.  Why throw it out when you can transform it into art?  It’s art with the “Steam Punk” vibe that will have to you staring at it for long periods of time. It approaches the look of a miniature futuristic city, or a special effect shot from some Sci-Fi movie and looks fantastic hanging on a nice wall. There’s something about the ruggedness all neatly contained within a finite space amongst a stylish decorated living environment.

 

Each piece is completely original and no two are alike and they keep evolving into something new each time I create one. They come in various sizes and the bigger the better in my opinion although the smallest in the series has its own appeal.  I try to keep the movement intact on as many parts that warrant it giving it an interactive appeal. Future pieces will included clocks as well to add even more usefulness to krashtrash.

 

I’ve tried to capture the essence of the pieces with photography but the pictures do not do the work justice.  Must be seen in person to truly enjoy.